Why the Millions We Spend on Employee Engagement Buy Us So Little →

Jacob Morgan writing for HBR:

When organizations make real gains, it’s because they’re thinking longer-term. They’re going beyond what engagement scores are telling them to do in the moment and redesigning employee experience, creating a place where people want, not just need, to work each day.

Some compelling evidence that shows our focus should be on how people experience their organisation day by day.

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Confusing the Roles of Consultant, Moderator, Facilitator →

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Eric Lynn:

It has become desirable–unfortunately–for “consultants” to describe oneself as a “facilitator”. The word seems to sound good, and where the client themselves are not quite clear on the significant differences in these roles, they may well be impressed enough to provide you with business, while being unaware of the consequences of not clarifying either precisely what they want/need or the depth of skills the consultant actually brings with them.

This continues along the same lines as my post from last Friday. It’s so important to distinguish between the roles of Consultant, Moderator and Facilitator. The article also highlights how critical contracting and re-contracting with clients is.

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The State of the Nation Starts in Your Street →

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Hugh Mackay, writing for The Conversation:

The message of the me culture is antithetical to our true nature as communitarians; as people genetically programmed to co-operate rather than compete; as people whose very identity is inextricably linked to the groups we belong to; as people who will shrivel up (emotionally, if not physically) if we are not nurtured by the experience of engaging with the lives – and sharing the pain – of those around us.

A thought-provoking look at the current ‘state of the nation’.

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What if No Participants Were ‘Difficult’? →

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Elizabeth Pinnington for Reos Partners:

In my early years of designing and facilitating programs, I thought my role included controlling meetings. I took responsibility for whether groups started at the agreed-upon time, how people behaved in meetings, and whether or not we achieved the desired outcomes. This approach automatically set me up to be in opposition with many participants. I was taking responsibility for work that was not mine to do in the first place, inadvertently creating “difficult” (that is, frustrated) participants by stepping over people’s boundaries.

Some nice reflections on the role of a facilitator. I don’t think there’s any way to overstate the importance of the idea of finding ‘one less thing to do’.

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Why We’re So Disenchanted with Work Today

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We all have the power, if not the obligation, to become active in changing this world of work in our society.

Via Open Culture.

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