The State of the Nation Starts in Your Street →

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Hugh Mackay, writing for The Conversation:

The message of the me culture is antithetical to our true nature as communitarians; as people genetically programmed to co-operate rather than compete; as people whose very identity is inextricably linked to the groups we belong to; as people who will shrivel up (emotionally, if not physically) if we are not nurtured by the experience of engaging with the lives – and sharing the pain – of those around us.

A thought-provoking look at the current ‘state of the nation’.

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What if No Participants Were ‘Difficult’? →

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Elizabeth Pinnington for Reos Partners:

In my early years of designing and facilitating programs, I thought my role included controlling meetings. I took responsibility for whether groups started at the agreed-upon time, how people behaved in meetings, and whether or not we achieved the desired outcomes. This approach automatically set me up to be in opposition with many participants. I was taking responsibility for work that was not mine to do in the first place, inadvertently creating “difficult” (that is, frustrated) participants by stepping over people’s boundaries.

Some nice reflections on the role of a facilitator. I don’t think there’s any way to overstate the importance of the idea of finding ‘one less thing to do’.

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Why We’re So Disenchanted with Work Today

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We all have the power, if not the obligation, to become active in changing this world of work in our society.

Via Open Culture.

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Why Workplace Leadership Demands Disruption →

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Mark C. Crowley on LinkedIn, discussing Gallup’s latest “State Of The American Workplace” report:

What Gallup’s research has consistently shown is that the primary reason two-thirds of the American working population is disheartened in their jobs is because they lack a manager who cares about them as a person, advocates for their wellbeing and seeks to maximize their full human potential.

I suspect this would also apply to the Australian working population. A sad indictment of our organisations. Reading this research strengthens my resolve to find better ways of working, helping people and organisations become more energised, engaged, and focused.

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Leadership Within the Paradox of Agency →

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Nora Bateson challenges our notion of leadership:

There is no such thing as an isolated individual—we are all interdependent. Period. Our evolution is only in our mutual contribution and learning. Mutual. Leadership is an evolving process and, as such, our understanding of what leadership is must evolve in accordance. In the past the world understood leadership as the great deeds of heroes; now we are in another phase of global transition that requires an understanding of leadership based on our understanding of interdependency.

The hero leader is a myth and idealising individual leaders disempowers and disengages us. In a changing world we’ll need to move past the ‘me’ of leadership to the ‘we’ as a collective. In organisations this means changing the focus away from developing individual leaders towards developing a leadership culture.

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